Brazil Welcomes Back Traditional Carnival Celebrations In Full Force

Brazil Welcomes Back Traditional Carnival Celebrations In Full Force- Samba music was blaring, revellers were dancing, and festivities and pageantry filled the streets of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Brazil’s Carnival celebrations began officially on Friday and will continue until February 22. This year’s events herald a return to the full-fledged celebrations last witnessed before the coronavirus pandemic.

The annual event, a surge of joy held in the days before Lent, the 40-day season when many Catholics fast and practise austerity, is expected to draw 46 million participants, according to the Brazilian government.

Crowds are pouring into the streets of Rio de Janeiro and other major towns for music, sightseeing, and parades during this year’s Carnival. More than 600 “bloco” licences have been granted in Rio alone, and many more unauthorised celebrations are anticipated to take place over the next few days.

Brazil Welcomes Back Traditional Carnival Celebrations In Full Force
Brazil Welcomes Back Traditional Carnival Celebrations In Full Force

Several “blocos” across the city draw large crowds; the local tourism bureau estimates that these events generate about $1 billion in extra sales for establishments like pubs and hotels.

However, given that Brazil was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s celebrations stand in stark contrast to those of previous years, which were far more subdued. According to the World Health Organization, the nation has reported 697,894 cases of the virus-related death, with only the United States exceeding that figure.

Brazil had to postpone Carnival in 2021 for the first time in a century as the government struggled to address the health situation. Moreover, in 2022, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo decided to postpone their celebrations for two months due to the Omicron variant’s rekindled anxieties. The outcome was a more subdued Carnival that was attended mainly by locals.

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Nonetheless, the economy surrounding Carnival is anticipated to improve as the tourism sector does as well. It can take almost a year to prepare for its parades and spectacles, which require armies of carpenters, electricians, costume designers, and choreographers.

Ros├óngela da Silva, wife of Brazil’s freshly inaugurated President Luiz In├ício Lula da Silva, is even anticipated to join the partygoers this year.

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